The Modern Bedroom

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Designing with the intention of creating a modern look to your bedroom is sometimes difficult to imagine, especially if this is your first foray into modern interior design. Don’t let this deter you—with the right guidance and your own inspiration you can breathe new life into your bedroom and make it a place worthy of more than just sleeping.  

 

There are many different ways you can create a modern statement in your bedroom and build out the rest of your design from this statement piece. For example, a large, structured, geographic chandelier can add drama to your bedroom and act as the centerpiece. Once the main focal point in the room has been decided upon, the rest of your design will follow. If your chandelier is made of glass and metal this might lead to a smattering of glass vases and metal bedroom furniture to accent.

 

Accent walls are another great way to give your design a jumping off point and there are several ways of doing this. You could try to create a modern look by using neutrals in a geometric fashion along the wall behind your bed. Alternatively you can try using little to no color in the rest of your room except for a “pop” of color, for example a vibrant chartreuse accent wall that matches a couple of throw pillows and your bedside lamp. If you aren’t feeling like paint is what inspires you try imagining a wall that is paneled with wood. This is a great way to bring both a modern and rustic look to your bedroom.

 

Floor choice is another important aspect of your room design.  Wood floors have a classic look and feel, but can easily fit into a modern design scheme.  A dark wood finish is a wonderful choice for a modern floor – for instance this hickory finish on Orchard Fields by Mohawk.  

 

The final touch to your modern inspired bedroom is to focus on soft lighting. You want to be able to relax in your bedroom.  Harsh lighting can not only ruin your design efforts, but strain your eyes or even make it difficult to fall asleep. What you choose for lighting will depend greatly on what type of statement piece you chose to base your room’s design off of. Look for lighting that uses soft, indirect light that can be adjusted based on your needs.

 

Using a focal point in your room and using that to inspire the rest of your room’s design is a great way to keep your design focused and edited, while still feeling inspired and fresh. 

Making Floor Selections Based on Proportion

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When making flooring selections keep in mind the proportion of the area you are selecting for. There is a certain scale in any space. Figure out what size your room is first. Is it large and vast? Or is it more intimate and cozy in scale?

Flooring patterns should be selected with care. Beware of selecting a large carpet pattern or large size tiles if the space is smaller. This can cause a room to feel overwhelming or lose the scale of the pattern. If you are unsure set a sample of the flooring in the room, step back and try to imagine it covering the floor. Leave it in the room for a day or two and see how you react to it.  In smaller areas it is important that the flooring isn’t too busy. Avoid intricate tile flooring and carpet patterns in a small space.

If you want to be creative with your tile design but don’t have a lot of room to work, consider selecting one size tile and create a design with just that size. You can place the tile on the diagonal. You can offset the tiles to create a more textured look.

Hardwood flooring can add warmth and comfort to a large area. When selecting hardwood consider using larger width planks for the larger scaled rooms and use smaller width planks for smaller spaces. Keep in mind you can also create a textured look by how you place your planks. You can place hardwood on the diagonal, offset the boards or create a chevron type of design. These are just a few ideas how to make your flooring more interesting.

A great way to visualize different flooring selections is by using our online Virtual Room Designer tool.  We even have a tool to upload your own photo in order to see how your room would look with various selections!  

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Laminate Installation

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Understanding the basics of installation will increase your knowledge of the process, and enhance your confidence in the installers.

  • use a professional
  • installed using a “floating floor system”
  • padded underlayment sits between the subfloor and the planks or tiles
  • planks or tiles sit on the underlayment, not anchored to the subfloor, and are connected to form a “one-piece” floating floor
  • installation can produce a hollow sound, reduced with a quality underlayment
  • floor will have a slight give underfoot, for more comfort
  • slight ridging or peaking where planks or tiles are joined can occur
  • glueless installations lock together without adhesive
  • consult the manufacturer’s warranty and care guide to see how often to clean the floor and the cost

 Potential additional expenses:

  1. Furniture removal/replacement
  2. Demolition/disposal of old floor covering
  3. Sub-floor preparation
  4. Product delivery
  5. Laminate installation, cost per square foot
  6. Materials required to complete

Process

  • installer inspects the  subfloor for imperfections
  • floor is then cleaned
  • underlayment placed over the subfloor
  • planks are laid
  • installers begin in the left corner leaving a minimum ¼” space between the flooring and perimeter walls
  • spacers are used to ensure the accuracy of this perimeter
  • after the floor is installed, spacers are removed and cover the perimeter gap with quarter round trim or a wall base
  • planks are laid in the desired pattern
  • planks are measured and cut to fit
  • floors that require glue on the sides begin by gluing the first two planks in the first row together
  • clamps or straps to hold pieces together

Before installation day

  • relocate furniture
  • empty china cabinets and closets
  • consider removal and disposal of old floorcovering
  • remove it yourself and leave 1 day before install
  • for carpet, leave tack strips and pull out staples

Trim

  • moldings and baseboards removed for additional costs
  • installers not responsible for breakage
  • painted baseboards, woodwork and paint may need retouching (your responsibility)

Sub flooring

  • may need to be prepared
  • new sub floor may be required
  • a job best left to the professionals

Door plan

  • possibility that doors may not clear the new floor and swing free
  • installers may remove doors and re-hang for an additional cost.
  • for clearance issues, arrange for a qualified carpenter to shave or cut down

Clean-up

  • waste will be produced
  • waste collected and disposed of by installers at an additional cost

Installation day

  • be home and available
  • be prepared for questions
  • presence insures the right wood is installed in the right areas
  • exact time of arrival cannot be guaranteed, only a time frame

Safety

  • installers use tools and techniques that can be hazardous
  • make sure that children and pets are out of the work area
  • follow through with a walk-thru
  • prior to completion-walk thru to ask questions and be clear on any final details

After installation day

  • established good ventilation for 48 to 72 hours
  • be prepared

 

Vinyl Flooring – An Introduction

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That’s why our goal is to provide you with quality resilient flooring products that offer a positive and lasting effect on your home. Products that beautify your home, enhance décor, meet your specific comfort, performance and budget needs, are easy to care for, and stand the test of time. To help achieve our goal, we’ve created a library of resilient flooring knowledge, style choices, shopping tips, buying considerations and upkeep dos and don’ts. It’s all conveniently contained in this section of our website.

Resilient floors

  • have some “give” or elasticity when you walk across them
  • often used in kitchens and baths
  • resistant to moisture
  • wide variety of colors and textures
  • easy to keep clean
  • main enemy is grit or sand
  • completely customize your floor by mixing contrasting colors patchwork style, creating medallions or curved cuts
  • some resilient floors are vinyl but not all vinyl floors are resilient

2 types of vinyl flooring: sheet vinyl and luxury vinyl tile (LVT)

LVT

  • all the advantages of vinyl
  • available in a wide array of colors
  • can look good anywhere
  • spare tiles can be kept on hand to repair worn areas
  • opens up unlimited possibilities for creating unique patterns

Vinyl flooring

  • no other flooring offers the selection, styling, ease of maintenance and value
  • can realistically mimic the look of ceramic, stone and wood grain
  • linoleum is not a resilient flooring

Natural Stone Flooring – Installation

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Use a professional

  • this type of floor is heavy, difficult work
  • it’s labor intensive and extremely exacting
  • not for the do-it-yourselfer
  • installing stone flooring is a skill that is developed through years of experience 

Process

  • prepare the substrate
  • cement subfloors can apply the mortar directly to it to lay the tile
  • wood subfloors require a CBU (cement backer unit)
  • movement in the substrate material can sometimes occur
  • for example, water penetrating the grout and/or freezing and thawing temperatures can sometimes cause tile to rise, crack or chip
  • area gets measured
  • snap chalk lines for an accurate layout
  • determine which pieces of tile will need to be cut to fit the area
  • tiles that need to be cut are measured and marked with a pencil
  • then use a wet saw with a diamond blade to cut through
  • begin setting the tile
  • thinset mortar, which is a cement-based adhesive, is applied to the surface with a trowel
  • tile then placed into the thinset and pressed firmly into place
  • imperfections in your subfloor will require differing amounts of mortar to be applied
  • this installation, known as a medium bed installation, is more time consuming and costly

Grout, wedge or butter

  • depending on the type of tilemay be installed with narrow grout joints
  • larger area – wedges or spacers may be used  to maintain consistent spacing
  • installers may also back butter the back of the tile with thinset mortar to strengthen the bond

Grout

  • after tiles are set and the thinset mortar has fully cured,  joints are filled with grout
  • sanded and un-sanded grouts are used
  • type of grout used is determined by the tile, grout joint and width
  • mixture is spread over the tiled area to fill in all the joints
  • sponge is used to remove excess grout from the surface of the tile

Before installation day

  • relocate furniture
  • empty china cabinets and closets
  • consider removal and disposal of old floorcovering
  • remove it yourself and leave 1 day before install
  • moldings and baseboards need to be removed for stone installation
  • installers not responsible for damage or breakage due to dry or brittle wood
  • painted baseboards, woodwork and paint may need retouching ( this is your responsibility)
  • existing sub floor may need to be prepared to receive the stone

Door plan

  • possibility that doors may not clear the new floor and swing free
  • installers may remove doors and re-hang for an additional cost.
  • for clearance issues, arrange for a qualified carpenter to shave or cut down

Clean-up

  • waste will be produced
  • waste collected and disposed of by installers at an additional cost

Installation day

  • be home and available
  • be prepared for questions
  • presence insures the right wood is installed in the right areas
  • exact time of arrival cannot be guaranteed, only a time frame

Safety

  • installers use tools and techniques that can be hazardous
  • make sure that children and pets are out of the work area
  • follow through with a walk-thru
  • prior to completion-walk thru to ask questions and be clear on any final details

After installation day

  • established good ventilation for 48 to 72 hours
  • be prepared

 

How Natural Stone Flooring is Made

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In this section we explain how a stone is manufactured. This information can be very advantageous because it enables you to understand stone from the beginning and evaluate its performance aspects: why certain stone floors wear better and longer. Plus, perhaps most important, understanding how a stone floor is created can help you better determine the value of stone keep you inside the borders of your budget.

  • blocks of stone are cut from earth with diamond studded, high speed equipment
  • diamond wire cutting system revolutionized the extraction process
  1. blocks then moved to a processing plant
  2. then cut into slabs
  3. takes 2 days for a saw to cut a 20 ton block of stone
  4. sent through a polishing machine for the finish
  5. finishes range from rough, rustic texture to mirrored polish
  6. slab is calibrated to uniform thickness
  7. customized for specific installations
  8. edges shaped and polished
  9. for tiles, slabs are just cut down
  10. polished with a different machine than slabs
  11. tiles packaged, shipped and stored (vertically only)

Manufactured Stone

  • also called Agglomerate Stone
  • synthetic stone made from natural stone chips
  • suspended in a binder such as cement, epoxy resins or polyester
  • popular types  made mostly of quartz
  • natural quartz gives depth, strength and consistency
  • offers look of natural stone but can be more cost-effective
  • available in a wide array of colors from neutrals to brights
  • scratch resistant but not scratch proof
  • doesn’t require sealing because it’s non-porous
  • highly resistant to staining, very hygienic and maintenance free
  • four times the flexural strength of granite, less chance of chipping or cracking
  • can be used in many applications, including flooring,

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